Memsaab Story: A Recommendation

Those who want to educate themselves about Indian films, specifically Hindi films, and even more specifically, ‘commercial’ Hindi films (i.e., mostly ‘Bollywood’ films), can find this blog very enlightening, or at least very useful.

She doesn’t speak Hindi, but she has developed an insight into these movies, not to mention a taste for them (almost like an Indian). The blog is also like a mini-encyclopedia of these movies. The fact that she has many inside (Indian) ‘informers’, many of whom are themselves very knowledgeable about such movies, helps in making the blog more interesting and educative.

No matter how much you know about these movies, you might still come across some new things. There are even resources which only a true (critical) fan can develop, aka trivia of certain kinds.

Of course there are some things which she might not be able to perceive in the same way as an Indian would (given not only the language gap). But that might also be an advantage for a critical fan. The outsider-observer’s advantage.

I have been watching movies from around the world and have often wondered whether I was really ‘getting’ those foreign language (that is, non-English, non-Hindi) films, as I knew very well how inadequate subtitles are. Sometimes they (subtitles) are hilarious (if you know the language) and other times they are idiotic. Still other times they are disorienting. Or infuriating.

After reading this blog (being a highly critical almost-fan of these movies), though, I think it is possible to develop an understanding of foreign language movies almost like not only a native speaker of that language, but like that of a native.

This makes makes me more confident that I can write about foreign films (American, French, Italian, German, South Korean, whatever) with as much authority as a native speaker and a native.

If I do my homework, that is, which I think I do (there are occasional slips).

This takes years of effort.

This kind of effort is quite pleasurable (usuallly), if only you can spare the time.

(The same goes for other forms of art, popular or otherwise, such as literature, painting or music).

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As I have hinted, she is no fan of ‘art’ films, which she thinks are like ‘watching the grass grow’. Not the same as my opinion.

IVR Systems – 1

When you use an IVR system, most of them ask you to enter some kind of access code, such as the credit card number and other details. Combined with the fact that you are calling from your registered phone (which should be enough to identify you), by the time you reach the customer representative, they should already have enough information about you.

Then why do they always ask you to speak  out loud the same sensitive details, such as the credit card details, Aadhaar number (or the Aadhaar enrollment number and the time of enrollment).

In some cases, after you have done all that, you are simply told to wait for some more days, without saying anything about your query.

Is that how it is supposed to be? It doesn’t sound right.