Merit-Credit Competition

I will scratch your …

I mean your back

You scratch my …

… I mean my back

 

I will give you a Like

You give me a Like

I will give you a Thumbs Up

You give me a Thumbs Up

 

Online, offline, be it wherever

These are the rules of the game

 

I am OK, you’re OK; both healthy

And all is well with the world

Even though losers go on and on

About the problems in the world

 

We play by the rules, and so

 

My merit will go up

My credit will go up

Your credit will go up

Your merit will go up

 

Together, both of us

Will win the competition

We will earn the position

That we don’t deserve

 

I mean, yes we actually do

Deserve on our very own

 

Then we will go pay our respects

To the billionaire, God bless him

For giving us all his all blessings

May he prosper forever and ever

 

And may he bless us in the world for

Doing well in all adult competitions

 

All Hail the Gods of Meritocracy!

 

Let’s launch a #hashtag as an offering

In his honour, so he gets eternal glory

We all get our prasad and our lollipops

 

After the fall of the causality frontier

Just as punishment determines crime

Our success also determines our merit

 

That is why we have the word loser

 

***

Updated on 25th August, 2019.

Memsaab Story: A Recommendation

Those who want to educate themselves about Indian films, specifically Hindi films, and even more specifically, ‘commercial’ Hindi films (i.e., mostly ‘Bollywood’ films), can find this blog very enlightening, or at least very useful.

She doesn’t speak Hindi, but she has developed an insight into these movies, not to mention a taste for them (almost like an Indian). The blog is also like a mini-encyclopedia of these movies. The fact that she has many inside (Indian) ‘informers’, many of whom are themselves very knowledgeable about such movies, helps in making the blog more interesting and educative.

No matter how much you know about these movies, you might still come across some new things. There are even resources which only a true (critical) fan can develop, aka trivia of certain kinds.

Of course there are some things which she might not be able to perceive in the same way as an Indian would (given not only the language gap). But that might also be an advantage for a critical fan. The outsider-observer’s advantage.

I have been watching movies from around the world and have often wondered whether I was really ‘getting’ those foreign language (that is, non-English, non-Hindi) films, as I knew very well how inadequate subtitles are. Sometimes they (subtitles) are hilarious (if you know the language) and other times they are idiotic. Still other times they are disorienting. Or infuriating.

After reading this blog (being a highly critical almost-fan of these movies), though, I think it is possible to develop an understanding of foreign language movies almost like not only a native speaker of that language, but like that of a native.

This makes makes me more confident that I can write about foreign films (American, French, Italian, German, South Korean, whatever) with as much authority as a native speaker and a native.

If I do my homework, that is, which I think I do (there are occasional slips).

This takes years of effort.

This kind of effort is quite pleasurable (usuallly), if only you can spare the time.

(The same goes for other forms of art, popular or otherwise, such as literature, painting or music).

***

As I have hinted, she is no fan of ‘art’ films, which she thinks are like ‘watching the grass grow’. Not the same as my opinion.